GMAT exam vs other tests: Our 6 step guide

Unlike what many test prep companies would like you to believe, GMAT is not a tough exam, albeit a different one.  The following points make it a different exam:

Computer Adaptive

Unlike other exams, GMAT exam uses a different scoring strategy. It adapts to the skill level of the applicant and constantly updates the difficulty level of questions appearing on screen based on a candidate’s performance, thus computing a true score based on the candidate’s performance. Moreover, the GMAT exam usually takes less time per subject per student and is more accurate in assessing a candidate’s ability than traditional paper-based tests.

Graduate MBA Applicants

GMAT is mostly taken by students who want to enter into one of the many graduate management programs at a variety of universities across the world. At the current count, about 4800 rel=”nofollow” programs at institutions and universities worldwide accept students through GMAT. Recently some MS programs have also extended their criteria to accept students’ GMAT score in lieu of GRE scores.

Holistic Academic Assessment

GMAT doesn’t focus only on one single subject in assessing the student’s ability. It tests a student’s Analytical (Quant and Integrated Reasoning section), Vocabulary & Grammar (Verbal Sections) and Efficient reading, comprehension and communication skills (Verbal and Analytical writing sections). These subjects or skills are life skills, and are of prime importance for anyone looking to make a mark in any field including business. And unlike other subjects, these skills or knowledge remain relevant throughout one’s life.

High Precision Assessment

Due to its adaptive nature, GMAT’s scoring algorithm, also called the Item Response Theory or IRT, constantly calculates the student’s ability based on his/her response to all the questions he/she has answered till that point, thus ultimately reaching a true score. All questions on the GMAT are given a weightage based on their difficulty level (or failure rate) which is calculated not from a few people but from the whole pool of test takers, thus ensuring a much more accurate rating, one which constantly upgrades as more and more people take that particular question. The theory takes into account those questions which have a greater chance of students getting them right due to guesswork and on the other hand assigning importance to questions which have greater degree of differentiability i.e. they differentiate between high scorers, average scorers and low scorers. This is quite important to distinguish between high scorers and medium-high scorers or low scorers and medium-low scorers, which becomes paramount when a large number of students take a test.

Immediate Results

A student receives an immediate score of his skill level as soon as he completes the test.  This amounts to time-saving across the full value-chain of the MBA application process and gives enough headway to the students to decide schools based on their GMAT score.

Year-round and Repeated Testing

One can take this test year round as against a particular time of the year. This is of great help to working professionals who can decide to take the exam whenever they feel-like instead of fearing losing another year in case they’re not able to take it the this time. Also, in case, one doesn’t perform as per his/her expectations, one can take the exam multiple times. The only limitation is one can take the exam only once every 31-day period and overall a maximum of five times in a 12-month period.

Comment Here

Leave a Reply